Who are the 64 players in the G.O.A.T WNBA Bracket Challenge?

Greatest of All Time Player Bracket Challenge!

Yesterday, we released the G.O.A.T WNBA Bracket Challenge for everyone to participate in since the NCAA Tournament was cancelled. Thank you to everyone who has shared it via Twitter, Facebook and more places. It is greatly appreciated.

Since the voting begins tomorrow at 10 am EST via Twitter Polls, we thought it would be a great idea to have the bios of the 64 WNBA players so all of you would have an informed opinion on who to vote for starting tomorrow. We have divided the 64 WNBA players bios by their regions to make it easier. We are starting with the first region W, followed by the second region, N, then the third region B and the final region A.

Region W

#1 overall seed Diana Taurasi vs #16 Jewell Loyd

#1 Diana Taurasi

Regarded as one of the most intense players, Diana Taurasi has backed it up in 15 seasons with the Mercury delivering 3 championships and becoming known as one of the toughest playoff competitors in league history. Spending her entire career with the Phoenix Mercury she has led the Merc to new heights winning the 2009 MVP 5 scoring titles including 4 in a row, while making 9 all star and ten all WNBA teams. But DT’s biggest accomplishments have come in the post season winning the Finals MVP twice on her way to being known as one of the best clutch performers in WNBA history.  – Glenn

#16 Jewell Loyd

Jewell Loyd shocked the world by becoming one of the first players in WNBA history to come out for the draft as a Junior out of Notre Dame. She has backed it up winning the 2015 Rookie of the year and has gone nowhere but up through her short but productive career. A member of the 2018 WNBA champion Seattle Storm, Jewell has become a fixture at 2 guard for the Storm producing close to 15 points and 3 assists per game in her short and burgeoning career. – Glenn

#2 Sheryl Swoopes vs #15 Natalie Williams

#2 Sheryl Swoopes (1997- 2011)

Three time MVP, four time champion, three time defensive player of the year, two time scoring champ, and a list of additional accolades too long to include here. Swoopes was one of the faces of the league from its inception and one of the most enduringly popular figures ever to grace a WNBA court. – Kevin

#15 Natalie Williams (1999-2005)

Three time All WNBA player and four time All Star. Williams joined the WNBA after winning MVP in the rival ABL. Despite being in her late 20’s at the time of her debut, Williams remained among the premier post players in the league for several years. Daughter of former NBA player Nate Williams. – Kevin

#3 Candace Parker vs #14 Ruth Riley

#3 Candace Parker (2008 – present)

Two time MVP, eight time All WNBA, and league champion. Parker led the league in rebounding and blocks twice each. One of the most engaging and popular players in league history, she has been one of the faces of the league from the moment she was drafted #1 in 2008. – Kevin

#14 Ruth Riley

A 6-foot-5 forward, played 14 seasons in the WNBA and retired in 2014 with the Atlanta Dream. Riley was a two-time WNBA Champion, a one-time WNBA Finals MVP and a one-time WNBA All-Star. – Nathan

#4 Sylvia Fowles vs #13 Nykesha Sales

#4 Sylvia Fowles

A 6-foot-6 center known as a great rebounder and defender, has played 12 seasons in the WNBA and currently plays for the Minnesota Lynx. Fowles is a two-time WNBA Champion, a two-time WNBA Finals MVP and a one-time WNBA MVP. Fowles also is a three-time WNBA Defensive Player of the Year and a six-time WNBA All-Star. – Nathan

#13 Nykesha Sales

A seven-time WNBA All-Star who played in the league for 10 seasons. Sales spent her whole career with the Orlando Miracle/Connecticut Sun making the All-WNBA Second Team in 2004. And she led the franchise to back-to-back WNBA Finals appearances in 2004 and 2005. – Lamar

#5 Becky Hammon vs #12 Kristi Toliver

#5 Becky Hammon

A six time WNBA All Star and 16 year WNBA veteran. Hammon has split her WNBA career between the New York Liberty and the San Antonio Stars where the Stars have since retired her jersey. She has made the All – WNBA Team four times, she won a bronze medal at the 2008 Olympics and took the San Antonio Stars to their only WNBA Finals appearance in 2008 – Lamar

#12 Kristi Toliver

She has one All-WNBA selection and one WNBA All-Star appearance. Toliver has won two WNBA titles one with the Sparks in 2016 and one with the Mystics last season. She also won the 2012 Most Improved Player award. – Lamar

#6 Chamique Holdclaw vs #11 Liz Cambage

#6 Chamique Holdsclaw

A six-time WNBA All-Star and a three-time All-WNBA Second Team selection. She played 11 seasons with her longest stint being her six seasons with the Washington Mystics. She was the 1999 Rookie of the Year and won her only scoring title in 2002. She also won back-to-back rebounding crowns too. – Lamar

#11 Liz Cambage

Cambage is currently one of the WNBA’s brightest stars. The 6’8” Center from Australia recently came back to the WNBA in 2018 after a short hiatus. During the 2018 season, Cambage set the WNBA record for most points in a single game with 53 points. Then in her next game she scored 35 points and set the record for most points in a two game span. That year she finished second overall in MVP voting. Over her career, Cambage has been selected for 3 all-star games. – Michael

#7 Ticha Penicheiro vs #10 Janeth Arcain

#7 Ticha Penicheiro

Penicheiro is one of the best passers the WNBA has ever seen. Currently, she ranks 2nd All-Time in both assists and steals. Over her 15-year career, Penicheiro led the league in assists 7 times, including a career-high 8 assists per game in 2002. She also won a WNBA championship with the Sacramento Monarchs in 2005. – Michael

#10 Janeth Arcain

Janeth Arcain is a Brazilian player who was one of the first WNBA players selected from the WNBA’s inaugural season in 1997. She was one of the most durable players and played for the Houston Comets dynasty years. She skipped the 2004 WNBA season to train for the Olympics. Janeth Arcain won Most Improved Player and First Team All WNBA in 2001 in which she averaged 18.5 points per game which became her best season – Aneela

#8 Dawn Staley vs #9 Alana Beard

#8 Dawn Staley

Dawn Staley is one of the WNBA’s most recognizable players and is currently the head coach of South Carolina women’s basketball team. Dawn originally played for the ABL before being drafted in the WNBA in 1999. She played for six seasons for the Charlotte Sting and was traded to the Houston Comets during her last season in the WNBA in 2006. She led the Charlotte Sting to the title game in 2001. She was a six time WNBA All Star. Aneela

#9 Alana Beard

Alana Beard is one of the WNBA’s most prolific defenders in WNBA history and played in the WNBA for 15 years. She was drafted in 2004 by the Washington Mystics and played for them until 2009. Beard sat out two seasons to recover from various injuries before signing with the Sparks in 2012 who she played for up till her retirement. She became a WNBA champion in 2016. Alana Beard has won WNBA DPOY twice and has been on WNBA All Defense First Team 5 times and WNBA All Defense Second Team four times. She was also a 4 time WNBA All Star. – Aneela

Region N

#1 Lauren Jackson vs #16 Emma Meeseman

#1 Lauren Jackson

Seen as one of the world’s greatest women’s players and one of the WNBA’s best post players in history. Lauren Jackson came to the WNBA at the tender age of 19 and did not disappoint quickly becoming the anchor in the middle of the great Storm teams of the 2000’s. Teaming up with Sue Bird they quickly formed one of the greatest inside outside tandems seen in the WNBA. Winning two titles in her 12 season career Injuries cut Lauren’s career short but she still was remembered as a 2 time scoring champion and one time rebounding champion who was a severe threat whenever she stepped onto the court.  – Glenn

#16 Emma Meeseman

Drafted as unheralded teen project out of Belgium, Emma Meesman blossomed into one of the WNBA’s most unlikely superstars under the tutelage of one of the WNBA greatest coaches ever in Mike Thibault. Spending her entire career with the Mystics, Meeseman is considered a deadly post with size, strength and toughness outside and a shot more accurate than some guards from three. Forming a mobile and ever changing front line with Elena Delle Donne that has brought respect and wins to the long struggling Mystics franchise, Meeseman’s presence has earned her the 2019 Finals MVP. And she did it off the bench. – Glenn 

#2 Cynthia Cooper vs #15 A’ja Wilson
#2 Cynthia Cooper
Quite simply the WNBA’s first megastar. Cynthia Cooper transcended a long career in Europe and exploded onto the American scene at the ripe age of 34. She was the scoring and overall leader of the legendary Houston Comets dynasty. Winning the WNBA title in each of her four full seasons and being named Finals MVP in each of those seasons. The 3 time scoring champ and 2x WNBA MVP in her first two seasons, Cooper set the benchmark for excellence that WNBA players still strive for today.  – Glenn
#15 A’ja Wilson (2018 – present)
2018 rookie of the year and two time All Star. Wilson is the youngest player in the bracket. She helped revitalize Las Vegas as the franchise tried to recover from a moribund tenure in San Antonio.The #1 pick in 2018, she’s one of the most promising young players in the league. – Kevin
#3 Seimone Augustus vs #14 Sancho Lyttle
Seimone Augustus (2006 – present)
Six time All WNBA player, eight time All Star, and four time champion. The #1 pick of the 2006 draft, Augustus won rookie of the year and became the face of the Lynx throughout their 2010’s dynasty including winning finals MVP.  – Kevin
Sancho Lyttle (2005-2019)
All Star and six time All Defensive team member. Lyttle led the league in steals twice. A high school track & field star, Lyttle was known for her speed and leaping ability. She helped Atlanta to the finals three times. A dominant Euroleague player she won Euroleague and domestic league titles with four different clubs. – Kevin
#4 Elena Delle Donne vs #13 Sophia Young
#4 Elena Delle Donne
A 6-foot-5 forward known has arguably the most talent player currently in the WNBA, has played seven seasons in the WNBA and currently plays for the Washington Mystics, averaging 20.3 points and 7.0 rebounds for her career. Delle Donne is a one-time WNBA Champion, a two-time WNBA MVP and a six-time WNBA All-Star. Delle Donne also was a WNBA Rookie of the Year and in 2019 became the only player in WNBA history to join the 50-40-90 club. – Nathan
#13 Sophia Young
A 6-foot-1 forward, played nine seasons in the WNBA and retired in 2015 with the San Antonio Stars. Young was a three-time WNBA All-Star because her scoring and rebounding ability as she averaged 14.3 points and 6.0 rebounds for her career. – Nathan
#5 Lindsay Whalen vs #12 Chelsea Gray
#5 Lindsay Whalen
A 5-foot-9 known as one of the most consistent and reliable WNBA players in history, played 15 seasons in the WNBA and retired in 2018 with the Minnesota Lynx. Whalen was a four-time WNBA Champion, a five-time All-Star and a three-time All-WNBA First Team. Whalen also was a three-time WNBA assists leader and currently has the most assists in WNBA Playoff history.  – Nathan
#12 Chelsea Gray
A three-time WNBA All-Star that has played five years for the Los Angeles Sparks. She is a two-time All-WNBA selection and won a title in 2016 with the Sparks. On July 7th, 2019 Gray recorded the eighth triple-double in WNBA history. – Lamar
#6 Brittney Griner vs #11 Betty Lennox
#6 Brittney Griner
A six-time WNBA All-Star that has played seven seasons all for the Phoenix Mercury. Griner has made All-WNBA five times and has made the All-WNBA Defensive First Team three times and the All-WNBA Defensive Second Team three times. A two-time Defensive Player of the Year who averages 3.0 bpg over her career. She is a two-time scoring champ and has scored over 20ppg the last three years. Griner won a WNBA title in 2014 and an Olympic gold medal in 2016. – Lamar
#11 Betty Lennox
Betty Lennox is a role model for perseverance and hard work. When she came into the league in 2000 she made an immediate impact for the Minnesota Lynx. That year she made her first and only all-star appearance and finished the season with a spot on the All-WNBA Second Team. Despite suffering a broken hip in 2001, Lennox went on to be named Finals MVP after she led Seattle to a championship in 2004. Lennox averaged about 22 points per game over the three games. – Michael
#7 Teresa Weatherspoon vs #10 Nikki Teasley
#7 Teresa Weatherspoon
Teresa Weatherspoon is one of the WNBA’s inaugural players and was a dynamic guard for the New York Liberty. She became well known for her half court shot to tie the WNBA Finals series with the Houston Comets in 1999. She helped guide the Liberty to it’s first ever WNBA Finals appearance in 1997 and then in 1999. She won the first ever WNBA DPOY in 1997 and won again the following year. – Aneela
#10 Nikki Teasley
Nikki Teasley helped the LA Sparks win their second consecutive title by hitting a series winning three pointer in the final seconds in 2002. She is a 2 time WNBA All Star and was named the WNBA All Star Game MVP in 2003. She played for seven seasons and was named to the All WNBA second team twice. – Aneela
#8 Candice Dupree vs #9 Cheryl Ford
#8 Candice Dupree
Candice Dupree is a model of consistency. Every time that she steps on to the court, she is going to get what she wants. This consistency is what led her to make 7 all-star games. Dupree was also a member of the 2014 Phoenix Mercury team that won a championship. She currently ranks in the top ten all-time for both total points and rebounds. – Michael
#9 Cheryl Ford
In just her rookie year in the WNBA, Cheryl Ford helped turn around the Detroit Shock from the worst franchise to the best record and the Shock won the WNBA Championship in 2003. Cheryl Ford is a 3x WNBA champion and was the 2x WNBA rebounding champion. She was a 4x WNBA All – Star and named WNBA All Star Game MVP in 2007. She was also named All WNBA Second Team. – Aneela
Region B
#1 Maya Moore vs #16 Tamecka Dixon
#1 Maya Moore
Quite simply the greatest player from the 2010’s. Maya Moore transformed the Minnesota Lynx from the bottom into a dynasty within one year of her arrival. She helped create one of the most respected franchises in the process. The 2014 MVP added leadership and scoring which went on to win four WNBA titles and 6 finals in 8 years. She was named WNBA Finals MVP in 2013. In 2019, Maya Moore stepped away from the game to pursue social justice opportunities and in the process added even more respect to an already legendary career.  – Glenn
#16 Tamecka Dixon
Never one to fall down the stairway to success, Tamecka Dixon was the picture of consistency in her 12 year WNBA career. She held the point guard position for the legendary Lisa Leslie of the LA Sparks when they won back to back titles. She helped Lisa Leslie, Mwadi Mabika and others get the ball while scoring for herself with a strong shooting touch and stout defense. – Glenn
#2 Tamika Catchings vs #15 Mwadi Mabika
#2 Tamika Catchings
The most respected woman in WNBA history for her class on the court and her community leadership off it. Tamika Catchings is known as one of the greatest ever to play the game. She reached 3 WNBA Finals and she was a WNBA champion in 2012. She’s a 5 time Defensive Player of the Year and was the 2011 WNBA MVP. Catchings’s all around game was second to none in her 15 year career, all with the Indiana Fever. She led the Fever to the WNBA playoffs in all but two of them. Her community work and leadership has made Tamika Catchings one of the WNBA’s greatest ambassadors and she continues in a new role as Fever President and General Manager. – Glenn
#15 Mwadi Mabika (1997 – 2008)

An All-WNBA performer and multi time All Star. As enforcer for the Sparks championship teams in 2001 and 2002, Mabika was a polarizing presence. Some admired her toughness and hard-nosed play, others felt she crossed the line into cheap shots and dangerous aggression. – Kevin

#3 Angel McCoughtry vs #14 Vickie Johnson
#3 Angel McCoughtry (2009 – present)
Six time All WNBA player, five time All Star, seven time All Defensive team, and two time scoring champ. McCoughtry was the #1 pick in 2009 and won rookie of the year. She led the league in steals twice. Abrasive and mercurial, McCoughtry has a reputation for being hard on coaches and teammates. Despite that, many players have had their best seasons playing alongside her. -Kevin
#14 Vickie Johnson
A 5-foot-9 guard, played 13 seasons in the WNBA and retired in 2009 with the San Antonio Stars. Johnson was a two-time WNBA All-Star. – Nathan
#4 Yolanda Griffith vs #13 Courtney Vandersloot
#4 Yolanda Griffith
A 6-foot-3 center known as a great rebounder and defender, played 11 seasons in the WNBA and retired in 2009 with the Indiana Fever. Griffith was a one-time WNBA Champion, a one-time WNBA Finals MVP and a one-time WNBA MVP. Griffith also was a one-time WNBA Defensive Player of the Year and an eight-time WNBA All-Star. – Nathan
#13 Courtney Vandersloot
A 5-foot-8 guard known as arguably the best passer in WNBA history along with Sue Bird, has played nine seasons in the WNBA and all for the Chicago Sky. Vandersloot is a two-time WNBA All-Star and was All-WNBA First Team in 2019. Vandersloot also is a four-time WNBA assists leader as she currently has the all-time average for assists, hovering at 6.2 assists in the regular season and 7.0 assists in the postseason. – Nathan
#5 Swin Cash vs #12 Rebecca Lobo
#5 Swin Cash
A 6-foot-1 forward known has one of the most consistent players in WNBA history, played 15 seasons in the WNBA and retired in 2016 with the New York Libery. Cash was a three-time WNBA Champion and a four-time WNBA All-Star. – Nathan
#12 Rebecca Lobo
She made her only All-Star appearance in 1999. And made the All-WNBA Second Team in 1997. And spent five of her seven seasons playing with the New York Liberty. – Lamar
#6 Deanna Nolan vs #11 Skylar Diggins – Smith
#6 Deanna Nolan
She was the 2006 WNBA Finals MVP and a three-time WNBA champion with the Detroit Shock. Nolan was a five-time WNBA All-Star and made All-WNBA three times. In 2016 she was named to the WNBA Top20@20 team for the league’s 20th anniversary.  – Lamar
#11 Skylar Diggins – Smith
Diggins-Smith is a perennial all-star currently set to play for the Phoenix Mercury in this upcoming season. In 2014 she won the WNBA’s Most Improved Player award after averaging 20.1 points per game. Her resume also includes 2 First Team All-WNBA appearances (2014,2017) and one 1 Second Team All-WNBA appearance. (2018) Also during the 2018 season she set her career high for points with 35. – Michael
#7 Rebekkah Brunson vs #10 Margo Dydek
#7 Rebekkah Brunson
Brunson is a 5 time All-Star over her 15-year career. During this span, she won 5 championships, the most in WNBA history. Brunson is also the WNBA’s all-time leading rebounder with a total of 3,356 rebounds. Rebekkah Brunson was a fierce defender which earned her a spot on 7 All-Defensive teams, 1 being First Team (2011) and 6 being Second Team. (2007, 2008, 2010, 2013, 2017, 2018) – Michael
#10 Margo Dydek
 Margo Dydek is the best shot-blocker in WNBA history. Dydek led the league in blocks eight different times. It’s not surprising that she also ranks first all-time for shots blocked. (877) It was Dydek’s defensive prowess that led her to two all-star teams in her career. In 1998 she was the number one overall pick in the WNBA draft. This made her the first non-American to be picked first in the draft. – Michael
#8 Breanna Stewart vs #9 Dewanna Bonner
#8 Breanna Stewart
What Breanna Stewart has done in her career is incredible. At just 25 years old, Stewart has already won both the regular-season league MVP and finals MVP. She has also made 2 all-star games in 2017 and 2018. She lost her 2019 season due to an achilles injury, so there will be a lot eyes on her to see if she can pick up where she left off in 2018. Breanna Stewart might be young, but by the time she wraps up her career, she will be among the league greats. – Michael
#9 Dewanna Bonner
Dewanna Bonner is one of the most versatile players and as a rookie who came off the bench she helped the Phoenix Mercury win their second championship in 2009. She won a second championship with the Mercury in 2014. She is a 3x WNBA Sixth Woman of the Year, a 3x WNBA All Star and was named to the All WNBA First Team in 2015. – Aneela
Region A
#1 Lisa Leslie vs #16 Briann January
#1 Lisa Leslie
One of the allocated Cornerstones of the WNBA Lisa Leslie created the LA sparks into the model franchise it continues to be today. Her massive post presence and inside shooting touch made her one of the most feared players on the court and her marketing savvy made her one of the most respected players off it. A 3 time MVP and the force behind the Sparks back to back titles in 2001 and 2002, Leslie is rightfully one of the WNBA’s true legends. – Glenn
#16 Briann January
One of the stediest hands in the Modern WNBA, Briann January combines unique passing ability, league leading 3 point shooting and strong defense to be one of the most complete true point guards today. A key cog in the Fever’s 2012 WNBA title and 2015 Finals run January is known for her accurate 3 point sho, leading the league twice in 3 point percentage, to keep defenses honest while still finding open shooters while working with the best in the game including Catchings, Griner and Taurasi. – Glenn
#2 Sue Bird vs #15 Tangela Smith
#2 Sue Bird (2002 – present)
Eight time All WNBA player, 11 time All Star, three time assist leader, and three time champion. Bird is the epitome of a WNBA point guard, balancing her own offense with her teammates perfectly. She is the league’s all time assist leader and helped Lauren Jackson and Breanna Stewart to MVP status. – Kevin
#15 Tangela Smith
Tangela Smith was one of the WNBA’s iron women. She only missed 15 games in a long and prosperous 14 year career. A total package of defense, rebounding and inside scoring,  Tangela was known best for her solid play with Sacramento alongside powerhouse center Yolanda Griffith and being the inside presence to the first two titles of the Phoenix Mercury. A key contributor who did the little things to ensure playoff success for her teams Tangela’s name can be seen as a major part of some of the greatest rosters in WNBA history. – Glenn
#3 Tina Thompson vs #14 Jonquel Jones
#3 Tina Thompson (1997 – 2013)
Eight time All WNBA player, nine time All Star, and four time champion. Thompson was the first player chosen in the inaugural college draft in 1997. She was a precursor to the ubiquitous “stretch four” of today, mixing the ability to bang in the paint with long range shooting accuracy. – Kevin
#14 Jonquel Jones
Already a multiple time All WNBA performer, Jones was the first player to pull down 400 rebounds in a season. She led the league in both rebounds and blocks and won most improved player and 6th woman of the year. She’s the most dominant of the league’s young post players. – Kevin
#4 Katie Smith vs #13 Allie Quigley
#4 Katie Smith

A 5-foot-11 wing known as a great scorer, played 15 seasons in the WNBA and retired in 2013 with the New York Liberty. Smith was a two-time WNBA Champion and a one-time WNBA Finals MVP. Smith was also a seven-time All-Star and had one of best scoring seasons in WNBA history with 23.1 points per game in 2001. – Nathan

#13 Allie Quigley

A 5-foot-10 guard known for her 3-point shooting ability, has played 10 seasons in the WNBA and currently plays for the Chicago Sky. Quigley is a three-time WNBA All-Star, a two-time WNBA Sixth Woman of the Year and two-time WNBA 3-Point Shootout Champion. – Nathan

#5 Tina Charles vs #12 Crystal Langhorne
#5 Tina Charles
A five-time WNBA All-Star and the 2012 league MVP. She has won two Olympic gold medals. Charles has All-WNBA eight times and is one of three players in WNBA history to lead the league in scoring and rebounding. She’s led the league in rebounding four times and is the New York Liberty’s all-time rebounding leader. She has been in the league for 10 seasons. – Lamar
#12 Crystal Langhorne
A two-time WNBA All-Star that has played in the league for 11 seasons. She won the 2009 Most Improved Player award and won a championship in 2018 with the Seattle Storm. During, 2013 she averaged a career-high 18.2 ppg. – Lamar
#6 Nneka Ogwumike vs #11 Delisha Milton Jones
#6 Nneka Ogwumike
A six-time WNBA All-Star and has played eight seasons in the league. She has spent her whole career with the Los Angeles Sparks and is currently their third all-time leading scorer. She was the 2016 WNBA MVP and has been All-NBA four times. She has made the All Defensive Team four times. And she hit the series winning shot in the 2016 WNBA Finals to bring the Sparks their first title in 14 years. – Lamar
#11 Delisha Milton Jones
DeLisha Milton-Jones is one of the most tenacious and enduring players in the history of the league. She held the WNBA for most games played in with 499 until Sue Bird passed her in the 2018 season. Milton-Jones is a 3-time all-star and 2-time WNBA Champion. She ranks in the top ten all-time in both steals and rebounds. She is also is 13th all-time in total points. – Michael
#7 Cappie Pondexter vs #10 Taj McWilliams – Franklin
#7 Cappie Pondexter
Cappie Pondexter will go down as one of the most explosive guards in the history of the WNBA. When she came into the league in 2006 she made an immediate splash averaging 19.5 points per game for the Phoenix Mercury. Pondexter is a two-time WNBA champion with the Mercury. She also took home the Finals MVP trophy for her performance in the 2007 WNBA Finals. Cappie finished her career as a 7-time all-star among many other accolades. – Michael
#10 Taj McWilliams – Franklin
Taj McWilliams – Franklin was one of the WNBA’s most durable players as she had a 14 year career starting in 1999 and ended in 2012 with 7 teams. She is a 2x WNBA champion, a 6x WNBA All Star and was named to the All WNBA Second Team and WNBA All Defense 2x times in her career. She is now the interim head coach for the Dallas Wings – Aneela
#8 Penny Taylor vs #9 Katie Douglas
#8 Penny Taylor
Penny Taylor is one of the best all-around players to ever play in the WNBA. In 2001 Taylor was drafted to the Cleveland Rockers with the 11th pick in the first round. She played a total of 13 seasons in the league, 3 of which resulted in championships. She also made 3 all-star appearances and was even named to the All-WNBA First team in 2007.
Michael
#9 Katie Douglas
One of the most efficient left handed players in WNBA history, Katie Douglas was known for being one of the best two way guards in terms of her shooting and scoring ability as well as her stout defense. As an Indianpolis native, she helped lead the Indiana Fever,  along with Tamika Catchings to the WNBA title in 2012. She was a 5x WNBA All Star. She was also named WNBA All Star Game MVP in 2006. She made the All WNBA Defense (both first and second) 5 times in her career. She was also made the All WNBA Team (first and second) 3 times in her career.  – Aneela

Who is the Greatest WNBA Player of All Time? Tournament Bracket Challenge!

Greatest of All Time Player Bracket Challenge!

Welcome to the Greatest WNBA Player of All Time Tournament Bracket Challenge presented by wbasketballblog.com!

The constant debates between who REALLY is the Greatest WNBA Player of All Time can be put to rest in this bracket challenge. There are so many different ideas of what makes a great player in terms of scoring the ball, defending, rebounding and what kind of impact they had in the game, etc.  We thought it would be a great idea to put it in the public’s hands once and for all to determine who is the Greatest WNBA Player of All Time.

The world is consumed of bad news everyday and since the NCAA Tournament was cancelled, why not throw our own tournament but still represent the WNBA and women’s basketball? So, we came up with this idea.

In order to undertake this challenge of putting the top 64 players, I reached out to ask individuals if they would like to participate. In turn, I received a lot of interest and we were able to quickly form a committee. The following committee members are: Kevin Brown, Glenn Starkey, Nathan Hiatt, Lamar Smith, Michael Olsen and myself (Aneela Khan).

As a committee, we decided that Diana Taurasi is the overall #1 seed and the four #1 seeds are Diana Taurasi, Lauren Jackson, Maya Moore and Lisa Leslie. The four regions are named W, N, B and A. Tomorrow, we will release the 64 players bios to give you an informed opinion on who to vote for.

Voting will begin at 10 am EST on Monday, March 30th and we will conduct the polls via Twitter. We will do one region each day. The winner will be announced some time in April.  Voting will be for 24 hours.

The G.O.A.T bracket is below. (We apologize for the size of the table and how small it is but it will make it easier for you to see.) Again, we deeply apologize for the size and the fact that there are no printed copies. Truly.

Listed below are the committee members bios who contributed to making this bracket happen. They are very diverse and come from different walks of life.

Aneela KhanTwitter@whoopsblogger

Aneela Khan is the owner of wbasketballblog.com. She became a fan of the WNBA in the year 2008 when Candace Parker entered the league. She was a fan of the San Antonio Stars before they were sold to Las Vegas. She started to blog and write about women’s college basketball, WNBA, Canada’s Senior Women’s National Team seriously in the year 2016.

Glenn Starkey  – Twitter – @Starkman55

Glenn Starkey has followed the WNBA since the year 2000. In 2004, he became a season ticket holder to the New York Liberty. He married a fellow New York Liberty fan, Rebecca in 2011. He has seen the New York Liberty go through many ups and downs throughout their tenure and has found a community with many other fellow Liberty fans. Glenn works in business insurance and also supports six women’s college basketball teams.

Kevin BrownTwitter – @over_short

Kevin Brown has been a WNBA fan since the inaugural season. He preferred the WNBA over the ABL because of how dominant Sheryl Swoopes was. Kevin has tracked WNBA stats and trivia over at his personal website WNBA odds and ends in which he has kept records from old and new seasons. His site has been simply instrumental in keeping WNBA data when there was no other option.

Lamar Smith – Twitter – @inside380

Lamar Smith is a sports journalism Masters graduate at Arizona State University. He is an avid basketball fan and in the fall he will be publishing his first book.

Michael OlsonTwitter @colombianmikey

Michael Olsen is a senior in high school. He is from Minnesota and is a Lynx fan and was able to witness the Lynx’s great dynasty. He really became supportive of the WNBA in 2016 and in his free time, he watches women’s college basketball, the WNBA and he also plays basketball. He also likes to study both the history of the league and historical players while still watching the young talent we see in the game today.

Nathan HiattTwitter – @NATE_HIATT

Nathan Hiatt is a sports journalist who graduated from Oklahoma State University in May 2018. He currently attends Arizona State University as a graduate student and is set to graduate this coming May.

Canadian Senior Women’s Basketball Team Member Kayla Alexander speaks on the postponed Olympics and COVID-19.

kayla alexander

The corona virus continues to spread across the world and wreak havoc on sporting events, both big and small. It has now forced the International Olympic Committee to postpone the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo to no later than summer 2021. The Olympic Games were set to start from July 24 to August 9th.

The IOC were originally supposed to have a decision come April, but national team federations such as Canada and Australia pulled their athletes from the Games and Team Australia even told their athletes to prepare for the games in summer 2021 before there was even a final decision made.

The Canadian Senior Women’s National Team was headed to the Olympics after they went 3-0 in the FIBA Olympic Qualifying Tournament. This was one of their best teams ever assembled as they had a mix of youth, experience and great defense and Team Canada was ranked fourth in the world, the highest standing yet.

Team Canada women’s basketball member Kayla Alexander was set to debut in her first Olympics this year and she took some time out of her day to answer questions regarding the Olympics, COVID-19 and the WNBA.  Recently,  she signed a standard contract with the Minnesota Lynx.

Q: As a Canadian Senior Women’s National Team member who was vying for a spot on the team, how were you training as COVID – 19 virus was becoming more and more serious?

KAYLA: When it was becoming more serious I was in season in Poland. Things progressed pretty quickly once the NBA suspended the season and the NCAA cancelled March Madness and all spring sports. Shortly after that our season went from the possibility of having a condensed playoff format to cancelled. When I returned home a decision had not yet been made by the COC and IOC, so I was doing what I could at home. My dad has some old workout equipment in the basement so our CB trainer created some strength workouts for me that I could do at home based on the equipment I had. I was also using the Nike NTC app for more endurance/cardio type workouts and yoga.

It was hard, but I am sure many athletes were trying to do the best with what we had. There is no way to replicate all of the skills and physical aspects required to play basketball, at home, so I could only imagine what other athletes felt not having access to pools, climbing walls, pole vaults, tracks, etc.

Q: How did you feel about the IOC still wanting to continue with the Olympics despite the global outbreak?

KAYLA: I think that they, like myself and I am sure many others, were trying to remain positive and see how the virus would play out. None of us know the future, and what would take place, so I think they were waiting and hoping that something positive would happen regarding the virus.

At the same time, it was frustrating not being able to train at the level that I wanted and needed to in order to prepare for the games. I can only imagine the stress this was causing fellow athletes, having to try to stay/ be fit, but also dealing with the unknown of what tomorrow held. I don’t think that the IOC would put the athletes, staff and the world at risk and expect us all to show up and perform if it wasn’t safe, and would have made a decision soon.

Q:  What was your real, raw reaction when you got the news that Team Canada was not going to send it’s athletes to the Games?

Heartbroken, sad and upset if I’m being honest. This would have hopefully been my first ever games. However, the leadership role Canada took as a nation, makes me proud of our country. I  respected their decision because it showed that their priority was to concentrate on the collective health and well being and take all necessary steps to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. In due time, sports will bring the world together again, when it’s safe for each and everyone of us.

Q: Your thoughts on the IOC’s postponement on the Games to summer 2021 and how it affects your plans going forward?

I think it was the right call, we will all still have a chance to compete in the future when it is safe to do so. It’s also takes a little of the stress out of the situation knowing that we have at the very least an idea of when to expect the games instead of a question mark.  I don’t know at what extent it affects my plans going forward because at this time, none of us know the future, we don’t know how long until we find a cure, how long it will spread, when it will be safe again, etc. So I am focused on the present, staying positive and doing my part, and trying my best to stay as ready as I can for when sports are safe again.

Q: Finally, your thoughts on the WNBA season? Should it go on? What do you think the WNBA should do if you were the WNBA commissioner?

I believe Cathy and the league will make a decision when appropriate that prioritizes the health and wellness of everyone. We don’t know what the future holds, but I am sure they will monitor the situation closely and come to a conclusion soon. Being my optimistic self, I’d like to hope that the world quickly heals from this virus and the WNBA can proceed as scheduled, but the health and safety of everyone will always come first.

2020 WNBA Mock Draft Version 3.0

megan walker, connecticut, 2020 wnba draft

We are now in March and normally around this time, the NCAA Tournament would be kicking off. Unfortunately due to the corona virus spreading across the world, the tournament was cancelled. It was for good reasons, although I, like many others were crushed since the NCAA tourney brings so many good memories and great performances. It also allows seniors to raise their stock and for the WNBA general managers to see what certain players are made of.

It also makes junior Megan Walker’s decision to join the draft early somewhat intriguing because there is still no word on whether or not the WNBA season will be cancelled and how they will deal with the draft which is happening in less than a month

I debated on whether or not to publish this latest version of the WNBA Mock Draft, but I thought my subscribers deserved a treat since I am not releasing it on Twitter and Instagram, so if you are viewing this post, it means you are viewing my blog and for that, I appreciate it. If you would like to view past versions (Version 1.0 and Version 2.0) you may do so here for Version 1.0 and here for Version 2.0. Thanks for your continued support!

ROUND ONE

  1. New York  Liberty- Sabrina Ionescu
  2. Dallas Wings – Satou Sabally
  3. Indiana Fever – Chennedy Carter**
  4. Atlanta Dream – Lauren Cox
  5. Dallas Wings – Megan Walker
  6. Minnesota Lynx – Tyasha Harris
  7. Dallas Wings – Ruthy Hebard
  8. Chicago Sky – Beatrice Mompremier
  9. Dallas Wings – Kiah Gillespie
  10. Phoenix – Mikiah Herbert Harrigan
  11. Seattle Storm -Crystal Dangerfield
  12. Washington –  Bella Alarie

ROUND TWO

  1. New York Liberty – Te’a Cooper
  2. Indiana Fever – Joyner Holmes
  3. Dallas Wings – Kathleen Doyle
  4. Minnesota Lynx – Nicki Ekhomu
  5. Atlanta Dream – Kaila Charles
  6. Phoenix Mercury – Mikayla Pivec
  7. Seattle Storm – Nausia Woolfolk
  8. Los Angeles Sparks – Haley Gorecki
  9. Dallas Wings – Leaonna Odom
  10. Los Angeles Sparks – Japreece Dean
  11. Connecticut Sun – Stephanie Jones
  12. Washington Mystics – Jocelyn Willoughby

ROUND THREE

  1. Atlanta Dream – Sara Rhine
  2. New York Liberty – Ciara Duffy
  3. Atlanta Dream – Becca Hittner
  4. Indiana Fever – Taryn McCutcheon
  5. Phoenix Mercury – Ja’Tavia Tapley
  6. Chicago Sky – Reili Richardson
  7. Seattle Storm – Katie Campbell
  8. Chicago Sky – Kylee Shook
  9. Las Vegas Aces – Jazmine Jones
  10. Los Angeles – Nadia Fingall
  11. Connecticut – Jordan Danberry
  12. Washington – Juicy Landrum

Women’s College Basketball Final Overall Player Rankings for 2019/2020 – Class by Class!

Sabrina Ionescu of Oregon

After 17 weeks of my weekly women’s college basketball players rankings, it is time to unveil the FINAL OVERALL Women’s College Basketball Players Rankings for the 2019/2020 season. From November to March, there have been some incredible moments and performances from seniors, juniors, sophomores and freshmen across the nation.

For 17 weeks, I took the best of the best women’s college basketball players and put them on my weekly lists. I looked at over 50+ schools this season because of the parity and the wide variety of upsets happening every week and the amount of upsets had usurped previous years which also required me to do an extra week of the weekly women’s college basketball rankings. I had never done that before as 16 weeks was often enough. I also tried my best to make the ratings fair and include a wide variety of big and small conferences. These rankings can take quite a bit of time to put together because they require a ton of time and attention.

I have been compiling these rankings for four years now and if you would like to check out last year’s edition, you may do so here. If you would like to check out the 2017/2018 edition, you can view it here. If you would like to view the 2016/2017 edition, you can view it here. If you have questions or this is your first time viewing the rankings, please read the FAQ page first.

Listed below are the top seniors, the top juniors, the top sophomores and the top freshmen for 2019/2020.

SENIORS

  1. Sabrina Ionescu – Oregon
  2. Ruthy Hebard – Oregon
  3. Lauren Cox – Baylor
  4. Mikayla Pivec – Oregon State
  5. Kaila Charles – Maryland
  6. Tyasha Harris – South Carolina
  7. Te’a Cooper – Baylor
  8. Beatrice Mompremier – Miami
  9. Kiah Gillespie – Florida State
  10. Bella Alarie – Princeton
  11. Crystal Dangerfield – Connecticut
  12. Mikiah Herbert Harrigan – South Carolina
  13. Jordan Danberry – Mississippi State
  14. Nicki Ekhomu – Florida State
  15. Jazmine Jones – Louisville
  16. Ayana Mitchell – LSU
  17. Chante Stonewall – DePaul
  18. Kylee Shook – Louisville
  19. Brittany Brewer – Texas Tech
  20. Japreece Dean – UCLA
  21. Kathleen Doyle – Iowa
  22. Ciara Duffy – South Dakota
  23. Haley Gorecki – Duke
  24. Jaylyn Agnew – Creighton
  25. Becca Hittner – Drake
  26. Stephanie Jones – Maryland
  27. Kianna Ray – TCU
  28. Sara Rhine – Drake
  29. Ja’Tavia Tapley – Arizona State
  30. Taryn McCutcheon – Michigan State
  31. Kamiah Smalls – James Madison
  32. Stella Johnson – Rider
  33. Kristen Spolyar – Butler
  34. Alexa Willard – Missouri State
  35. Amber Melgoza – Washington
  36. Alana Gilmer – Marist

*Just missed: Jaelyn Brown (California), Emma Guy (Boston College), Juicy Landrum (Baylor), Dominique Oden (Purdue), Jocelyn Willoughby (Virginia)

*Honourable mention: Taiye Bello (Minnesota), Katie Campbell (Gonzaga), Fallyn Freije (Montana State), Rebekah Hand (Marist), A’erianna Harris (Purdue), Aislinn Konig (NC State), Francesca Pan (Georgia Tech), Reili Richardson (Arizona State), Jayla Scaife (Dayton), Abi Scheid (Northwestern), Rachel Thompson (Colgate), Peyton Williams (Kansas State), Nausia Woolfolk (Florida State)

JUNIORS

  1. Chennedy Carter – Texas A&M
  2. Satou Sabally – Oregon
  3. Michaela Onyenwere – UCLA
  4. Aari McDonald – Arizona
  5. Rennia Davis – Tennessee
  6. Megan Walker – Connecticut
  7. Destiny Slocum – Oregon State
  8. Chelsea Dungee – Arkansas
  9. Janelle Bailey – North Carolina
  10. Kysre Gondrezick – West Virginia
  11. Vivian Gray – Oklahoma State
  12. Dana Evans – Louisville
  13. Lindsey Pulliam – Northwestern
  14. Lauren Heard – TCU
  15. Ali Patberg – Indiana
  16. Arella Guirantes – Rutgers
  17. N’dea Jones – Texas A&M
  18. Kiana Williams – Stanford
  19. Kayla Wells – Texas A&M
  20. Jenn Wirth – Gonzaga
  21. Kayla Jones – NC State
  22. Jill Townsend – Gonzaga
  23. Selena Lott – Marquette
  24. Micaela Kelly – Central Michigan
  25. Maddi Utti – Fresno State
  26. India Pagan – Stony Brook
  27. Brice Calip – Missouri State

*Honourable mention: Erin Boley (Oregon), Lorela Cubaj (Georgia Tech), Ciera Johnson (Texas A&M), Kiara Lewis (Syracuse), Victoria Morris (Old Dominion), Nancy Mulkey (Rice), Chelsea Perry (UT Martin), Jaelynn Penn (Indiana), Destiny Pitts (Minnesota), Amaya Scott (Bethune-Cookman), Hannah Sjerven (South Dakota), Macee Williams (IUPUI)

SOPHOMORES

  1. Rhyne Howard – Kentucky
  2. Christyn Williams – Connecticut
  3. Elissa Cunane – NC State
  4. Jessika Carter – Mississippi State
  5. NaLyssa Smith – Baylor
  6. Olivia Nelson – Ododa – Connecticut
  7. Charli Collier – Texas
  8. Lexi Hull – Stanford
  9. Ashley Joens – Iowa State
  10. Cate Reese – Arizona
  11. Naz Hillmon – Michigan
  12. Shakira Austin – Maryland
  13. Jasmine Franklin – Missouri State
  14. Lexi Held – DePaul
  15. Monika Czinano – Iowa
  16. Queen Egbo – Baylor
  17. Grace Berger – Indiana
  18. Taylor Mikesell – Maryland

*Just missed: Erica Johnson (Ohio), Sonya Morris (DePaul)

*Honourable mention: Elizabeth Balogun (Louisville), Dorka Juhasz (Ohio State), Ajah Wayne (Old Dominion)

FRESHMEN

  1. Aliyah Boston – South Carolina
  2. Haley Jones – Stanford
  3. Taylor Jones – Oregon State
  4. Rickea Jackson – Missisippi State
  5. Zia Cooke – South Carolina
  6. Ashley Owusu – Maryland
  7. Alissa Pili – Southern California
  8. Jakia Brown – Turner – NC State
  9. Aliyah Matharu – Missisippi State

*Honourable mention: Kierstan Bell (Ohio State), Jordan Horston (Tennessee), Ashten Prechtel (Stanford)

Women’s College Basketball Player Rankings – Class by Class! Week 17

Celeste Taylor , texas

*NOTE – These final weekly rankings update was for the final week of regular women’s college basketball season and before the conference tournaments started. I am just posting now because of emergency situation with my family. The final overall one will come out a later date. *

This is it. This is the final weekly rankings update for this women’s college basketball season. I will unveil the FINAL OVERALL rankings for 2019/2020 next week, so make sure you are subscribed so you can be one of the first ones to receive the rankings.

In what is now my fourth year compiling these rankings, I have never gone further than Week 16. I have never needed to. I, usually had a solid idea of who was going to make the final cut for each class and this week would have been the final overall rankings. However, there were so many upsets to ranked teams this season, so many top teams falling to non ranked teams and so much balance this year that a lot more players ended up making the list. Not only that, several top players would be on the list and then they would immediately fall off due to upsets or their team was not playing up to their standard.

There were some more upsets this week to ranked teams and so, a bit of shuffling was required for this final week. If your favourite player has been playing well and is not on this week, rest assured they have made it in previous weeks and they may be in the FINAL OVERALL rankings released next week. As always, thanks for the support and please continue to visit my blog and tell others to do so. Thank you!

Listed below are the top 36 seniors, the top 27 juniors, the top 18 sophomores and the top 9 freshmen for the week of February 24th to March 1st. If this is your first time viewing these rankings or have questions, please read the FAQ page first. Click here to view last week’s rankings.

SENIORS

  1. Sabrina Ionescu – Oregon
  2. Ruthy Hebard – Oregon
  3. Lauren Cox – Baylor
  4. Jaylyn Agnew – Creighton
  5. Mikiah Herbert Harrigan – South Carolina
  6. Kylee Shook – Louisville
  7. Tyasha Harris – South Carolina
  8. Te’a Cooper – Baylor
  9. Kaila Charles – Maryland
  10. Jordan Danberry – Mississippi State
  11. Mikayla Pivec – Oregon State
  12. Bella Alarie – Princeton
  13. Joyner Holmes – Texas
  14. Stephanie Jones – Maryland
  15. Haley Gorecki – Duke
  16. Beatrice Mompremier – Miami
  17. Japreece Dean – UCLA
  18. Jazmine Jones – Louisville
  19. Kathleen Doyle – Iowa
  20. Becca Hittner – Drake
  21. Abi Scheid – Northwestern
  22. Ciara Duffy – South Dakota
  23. Kamiah Smalls – James Madison
  24. Jaelyn Brown – California
  25. Jocelyn Willoughby – Virginia
  26. Alexis Lewis – Seton Hall
  27. Alana Gilmer – Marist
  28. Cierra Johnson – Alabama
  29. Ja’Tavia Tapley – Arizona State
  30. Alissa Alston – St. John’s
  31. Taylor Frederick – South Dakota
  32. Jayla Scaife – Dayton
  33. TeTe Maggett – Illinois State
  34. Ivy Wallen – North Alabama
  35. Michal Miller – Wright State
  36. Madeline Smith – Montana State

JUNIORS

  1. Satou Sabally – Oregon
  2. Megan Walker – Connecticut
  3. Rennia Davis – Tennessee
  4. Aarion McDonald – Arizona
  5. Kiana Williams – Stanford
  6. Michaela Onyenwere – UCLA
  7. Selena Lott – Marquette
  8. Lindsey Pulliam – Northwestern
  9. Destiny Slocum – Oregon State
  10. Kayla Jones – NC State
  11. Ali Patberg – Indiana
  12. Lexi Gordon – Texas Tech
  13. Lauren Van Kleunen – Marquette
  14. Arella Guirantes – Rutgers
  15. Mariella Fasoula – Vanderbilt
  16. Jenn Wirth – Gonzaga
  17. DiDi Richards – Baylor
  18. Awa Trasi – LSU
  19. Oshlynn Brown – Ball State
  20. Maddie Waldrop – UT Martin
  21. Abby Kapp – Bucknell
  22. Victoria Morris – Old Dominion
  23. Dayzsha Rogan – Jackson State
  24. Amaya Scott – Bethune – Cookman
  25. Anna McLeod – Abilene Christian
  26. Natalie Armstrong – Samford
  27. Mallory McGwire – Boise State

SOPHOMORES

  1. Lexi Hull – Stanford
  2. Elissa Cunane – NC State
  3. Rhyne Howard – Kentucky
  4. Monika Czinano – Iowa
  5. Grace Berger – Indiana
  6. Shakira Austin – Maryland
  7. Charli Collier – Texas
  8. Nia Clouden – Michigan State
  9. Lotta-Maj Lahtinen – Georgia Tech
  10. Laren Vanarsdale – Hampton
  11. Hannah Pratt – Columbia
  12. Lindsey Thall – Kent State
  13. Kate Mager – Merrimack
  14. Jamilyn Kinney – Belmont
  15. Aja Blount – Coastal Carolina
  16. Jasmine Smith – Rice
  17. Emily Ivory – UMKC
  18. Queen Egbo – Baylor

FRESHMEN

  1. Celeste Taylor – Texas
  2. Sam Brunelle – Notre Dame
  3. Alissa Pili – USC
  4. Aliyah Matharu – Mississippi State
  5. Aliyah Boston – South Carolina
  6. Elizabeth Kitley – Virginia Tech
  7. Taylor Jones – Oregon State
  8. Anne Simon – Maine
  9. Ellie Mitchell – Princeton